Mrs. C

Although I’m so ready for summer, at the same time I kind of don’t want to move on, either. I’m going to miss being a sophomore. I think the biggest reason I don’t want to move on is because I’m going to miss my World History/AP Euro teacher, Mrs. C. She’s this crazy nice teacher that I’ve been incredibly lucky to have for both freshman and sophomore year. She likes to read!!! The same books I like to read!!! I love talking to her about what I’ve read, recommending new things to her, and freaking out over book characters (specifically shadowhunters, heehee). I always looked forward to her class, knowing that we were going to have a fun time. I’m going to miss being able to recommend new books to her. I’m going to miss her.

Thank you, Mrs. C! I loved being your student. This post is for you, and all the other teachers who ever encouraged me and made me wish I didn’t have to move on. I’ll always remember you. ❤

I had a dream with Mrs. C in it… 

My best friends Tasha, Dina, Peter, Jack and I all decided to go and take a hike. To go hiking, we had to take this little school bus. It would taxi us around to different places in the woods where we could get out, walk around and explore, and then come back to move to a different spot. Mrs. C was there, almost as if she were a chaperone on a field trip. My friends and I all had a blast exploring together. The only problem occurred when this random annoying kid started to butt in, interrupting our conversations and giving lengthy lectures on boring topics that none of us had any interest in.

Jack and I became separated from the group as we listened to the kid speak. Late to our original bus, we were forced to cross the highway and walk until we could find the next one that came. The kid followed us.

The bus took us away from the woods and to an outdoor sports store where we met up with everyone else. I started looking at these t-shirts with Mrs. C. We were trying to find t-shirts to give to everybody to remember that day of hiking. The random annoying kid who had followed us from the woods interrupted our conversation, but Mrs. C was able to deftly steer him away. Go Mrs. C!

In a totally different part of my dream, I was late to school (I missed the bus). I was freaking out because I was so late. For some reason, my mom took mercy and called me in sick, letting me have the day off. (In real life my mom would never let me miss school unless I was actually sick.) I was freeeeeeee. On my day off, I decided to take a walk. It was a beautiful clear sunny day. As I strolled along, I saw two women launch this hot air balloon contraption from their front yard into the air. But even though it looked like a hot balloon, it wasn’t. It was a giant net that they had built to catch their lost cat. Somehow they were able to control where the net went and they landed it on their cat across the street.  The net broke and the cat got free once more, leaving the women to chase after it. I watched the whole scene unfold behind bushes further down the street. After that, I woke up to go to school. My mom didn’t call me in sick.

And of course!

I couldn’t just leave this post without talking about a book. I’m going to review the last book that I told Mrs. C about. I hope she enjoys it. BE WARNED! The book summary and review contain no spoilers, but both parts will spoil Hamlet by William Shakespeare.

Ophelia by Lisa Klein

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Summary Ophelia, known for her part only as Hamlet’s beloved, is now allowed to tell her side of the story. She begins her journey as a young girl, employed as a lady in waiting in the service of the queen of Denmark. Without being as restricted as other girls in that time (during the Reformation! thank you AP Euro!) because of no mother and a neglectful father, she becomes an independent clever young woman, able to debate philosophy as well as (let’s face it- even better than) a man.

As Ophelia matures, she sometimes runs into Prince Hamlet, as one might expect when you live in the same castle as each other. Hamlet, when exposed to her wit and charm, takes an interest in her. Soon they are both blissfully in love, hiding away from the rest of the court with the help of dear Horatio, Hamlet’s right-hand man.

Yet, the good can not last forever. Tragedy strikes when Hamlet’s father is killed, and Hamlet begins his wild display of madness. Hurt by the one she had loved most, Ophelia needs to decide how to live the rest of her life- or if she even should.

Review-It was intriguing watching the play unfold through Ophelia’s eyes. Klein did not just stick to the events that strictly happened within the play, but gave the characters history, explaining what led them up to where they were when the play occurred. I liked reading about Ophelia’s childhood, made doubly interesting because the author had done her research and included elements of the time period within the events. I’ve always found historical fiction interesting, and the history was pretty cool to see incorporated in the book.

I love Ophelia’s character. She was a strong young woman who was able to think for herself in a time when so many women were virtually powerless. Part of her independence comes from her love of reading, which is also what made me love her (characters who read are my favorite, no surprise). Through literature, she is able to educate herself on all different sorts of matters, leaving her more capable to deal with herself and others. A particular other character that was quite interesting to see was Hamlet. He was quite a different person before he became bent on revenge, and I can see how Ophelia came to love him. And then there’s Horatio. *sigh* He was such a cutie. So humble and honest in the midst of such violence and treachery. He was definitely one of my favorites. I like how all the characters evolved within the play, turning into the people you knew they had to be, Ophelia’s viewpoint showing why they were that way, and maybe even giving a different angle as to who they really were as a person.

Ophelia’s first person narration was fascinating. Klein was able to make her thoughts and the conversations between characters flow easily. It couldn’t have been easy having the characters speak in Shakespearian English. I think if I ever tried to write using Shakespearian language, I would start going crazy. I’d have to look up everything to make sure it made sense. I bet I would forget that I had to write like Shakespeare and end up having to redo whole pages. Klein was able to brilliantly intertwine Shakespeare and today’s language, giving you a Shakespearian feel in an understandable format. Bravo for Klein.

Overall, I really enjoyed reading this book. I’m currently considering whether or not I should put it on my book buy list (the copy I have right now is from the library). It’s definitely a must read for those interested in Shakespeare, history, and/or romance.

Ta-ta for now and happy reading!

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